Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Do they have "good" hospitals in Romania?

This morning's post comes courtesy of a news report I read about a Mormon sister missionary in Romania.  Sister Jacie Robinson was supposed to come home to Utah from Romania today, but instead, she's in a hospital.  On Friday of last week, Sister Robinson fainted.  It turns out she has encephalitis, which is a brain infection.

I don't know how this young woman got her infection.  It's my understanding that encephalitis can come on very suddenly.  I have heard of LDS missionaries getting sick or injured while in the field, due to being exposed to danger.  It does not sound like that's what happened in this case.

Someone on RfM posted about Sister Robinson, wanting to know if Romania has "good" hospitals.  To be honest, I've never visited Romania; however, I did go through a brief Romanian film phase.  One of the movies I watched was a "black comedy" from 2005 called The Death of Mr. Lazarescu.


A trailer for the Romanian film, The Death of Mr. Lazarescu.

I was intrigued on several levels by The Death of Mr. Lazarescu.  First off, I spent two years living in Armenia, which is a former Soviet republic.  Although Armenia and Romania are very different places, they do have some similarities, even in this era of post communism.  Secondly, I studied public health in graduate school, so although I myself almost never visit doctors or hospitals, I do find healthcare interesting, especially in the international arena.  

Some time ago, I rented The Death of Mr. Lazarescu from Netflix and spent a couple of hours watching it.  The film is in Romanian, but it has English subtitles.  The subtitles force you to pay close attention.  The film is billed as a "black comedy" and some parts of it are truly funny, but in reality, it's a very sad and sometimes poignant film.  It doesn't just apply to Romania, either.  


The film in its entirety.    

For those who would rather not watch the film (which I do recommend), here's a basic synopsis.  Mr. Dante Lazarescu is a lonely widower who has three cats and a bad headache.  He calls an ambulance on an old rotary style phone, even though he doesn't think the headache is serious.  When the ambulance doesn't come, he asks his neighbor for help.  The neighbors give him some pills for his nausea, reveal him as a drunk, then help him to bed.  The neighbors call again for an ambulance.

When the ambulance arrives, the nurse on board suspects the old man has colon cancer.  She calls Mr. Lazarescu's sister and tells him she should visit him in the hospital.  She then gets him into the ambulance and the nurse, the old man, and the driver spend the rest of the night going to different hospitals around the city, trying to get Mr. Lazarescu admitted.   

As the night progresses, the old man's condition worsens.  He loses the ability to speak coherently and wets his pants.  Even though he's very ill and needs treatment, no one wants to bother to examine Mr. Lazarescu.  He keeps getting shuffled from one place to the next.  He finally gets an operation to remove a blood clot, but the doctor quips they've saved him from the clot only so he can die of liver cancer.  

As I mentioned before, I honestly don't know about the quality of Romanian hospitals.  I did see a few interesting comments on the YouTube videos I posted.  I did have a couple of colleagues who experienced Armenian medicine in the 1990s.  While it wasn't deadly for them, it was not like what we in the United States are used to.  On the other hand, people in places like Romania probably don't go bankrupt when they get sick, either.  

I think The Death of Mr. Lazarescu is worthy viewing, if you can stand the dark humor of it.  Some people might find it depressing.  I thought it was an interesting film.  Actually, Romania has put out some great movies in the past couple of decades.  I've watched three or four of them and been impressed by their quality.  If you have the patience to read subtitles and enjoy foreign films, I'd say your time will be well spent watching a couple of Romanian flicks.

As for Sister Robinson, I hope she makes a full and speedy recovery.  Encephalitis is scary business, no matter where you are!

On another note...
  
Bill is trying to arrange for some time off at the beginning of May so we can take a much needed break from Germany.  Actually, I don't mind Germany... I just think Bill needs a breather.  Work has been rather stressful for him lately.

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