Saturday, May 13, 2017

Judy Collins shares her thoughts on Cravings...

I have loved Judy Collins' beautiful music since I was about 18 years old.  She's recorded so many beautiful songs over the years and inspired others as well.  Although I knew she'd had trouble with alcohol and eating disorders, I didn't know the extent of her problems until I picked up her latest book, Cravings: How I Conquered Food.

Published on February 28, 2017, Cravings offers readers insight into what may have caused Judy Collins' issues with booze and food.  Collins' theories may also be helpful to other readers.  The book is also about Judy Collins' life, so if you read it, it helps to also be interested in her life story.  I suspect a lot of younger people may not be fans of Judy Collins' music, although I think they should be.  I should also mention that this is the first book I've read by Judy Collins, so I wasn't perturbed to read about her life.  Others who have read her earlier memoirs might feel like parts of this book are reruns.


Here Judy sings "Someday Soon" with Stephen Stills, who famously penned "Suite Judy Blue Eyes" in her honor.

Collins writes that when she was growing up, she loved all things made of flour, sugar, wheat, and corn.  She was addicted to sugar and would eat sweet things constantly.  That sugar obsession later turned to unsightly pounds and a neverending compulsion to eat more.  She eventually went on to become bulimic and would binge and purge to the point of developing a vocal cord hemangioma.  It almost destroyed her voice.

As she got older, Collins took up drinking and smoking.  She became an alcoholic and, for many years, would even drink heavily before and after taking the stage.  Although she indulged in self-destructive behavior, Collins somehow knew that what she was doing was dangerous.  She sought help from doctors, most of whom told her she didn't have a problem.

Eventually, Collins realized that there was a link between her cravings for sugar, flour, wheat, and corn and her addiction to alcohol.  She eliminated the problem foods from her diet and adopted what looks to me to be a paleo diet.  She says now her weight is stable and she know longer has such intense cravings for unhealthy foods or booze.  She also credits spending time in support groups like Alcoholics Anonymous and employing the Grey Sheet Diet Plan for helping her to stop the insanity.


"Suite Judy Blue Eyes"

Aside from explaining her secrets to eating and drinking success, Collins writes about her son, Clark Taylor, who sadly died after committing suicide.  Collins herself attempted suicide, although she doesn't delve too much into her experiences with suicidal ideation.  Before he passed, Clark fathered Judy Collins' only grandchild, Hollis, who is now herself a mother.  I enjoyed reading about Judy's family and can tell that she loves them very much.  She writes that not a day goes by that she doesn't think about and miss her son.

I also enjoyed reading about Collins' musical training.  Originally, she was trained as a pianist and she studied great and challenging classical works.  I never knew Judy Collins was once being groomed for the classical music world.  As she became a teenager, she was lured into folk music.  She picked up a guitar, learned how to play, and began to sing.  I was astonished to read that she once had a very limited vocal range.  Work with an excellent voice teacher eventually stretched her range to about three octaves, quite respectable for a singer.  I have always liked her voice for its ethereal quality.  I think my own style is kind of like hers.

Anyway... I thought Cravings was well-written and engaging.  It didn't take forever to finish.  Because I haven't read Collins' other books, the material and new for me.  It's also relevant for me personally on many levels.  I liked that she drew in interesting examples from history to backup her theories about diet, drinking, and health.  I learned something new in those passages.  And, given that Judy was born in 1939 and is still making albums and writing books, I figure she must be doing something right.  I recommend her book to those who are thinking about reading it.



   

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