Wednesday, July 27, 2016

A review of Shannon Miller's It's Not About Perfect: Competing for My Country and Fighting for My Life

Hi everybody.  I know I could be writing about politics or that poor French priest who was murdered near Normandy yesterday, but I think enough people are writing about those topics.  Besides, it's high time for another book review.  I used to crank them out weekly and now it takes me a lot longer to plow through my reading.  Today's review is about America's most decorated female gymnast and ovarian cancer survivor, Shannon Miller, and her book It's Not About Perfect: Competing for My Country and Fighting for My Life.  

With help from ghost writer, Danny Peary, Miller published her book in the spring of 2015.  Although I kind of quit watching gymnastics years ago, Shannon Miller comes from an era when I did used to tune in.  I remember seeing her when she was just 11 years old, competing in a meet that was aired on the now defunct cable channel, Home Team Sports.  Even back then, she was very impressive.  Years later, when she and her teammates won gold in the 1996 Atlanta Summer Olympics, I remembered her performance as a child and marveled at how far she'd come.


Shannon Miller at age 11.

Today, Shannon Miller has a degree in law and is the mother of a son and a daughter.  Her daughter, Sterling Diane, was born against the odds after Miller had her left ovary and fallopian tube removed and endured nine weeks of chemotherapy.  Miller has her own foundation, Shannon Miller Lifestyle, which is devoted to encouraging health and fitness for women.

Miller reminds readers that her potentially deadly cancer was discovered when she was feeling just fine.  It was a routine visit to her gynecologist that uncovered a cancer that often kills women because by the time it's discovered, it's too far advanced to treat effectively.  I agree with her on an intellectual level that people should pay attention to their health.  However, as a healthcare consumer, I think it's very difficult for many folks to be attentive to their health.  For one thing, it's takes time and money that many people don't have.  For another thing, seeing doctors is potentially very demoralizing.  Most of us would rather be doing something else.

In her book, Miller doesn't focus too much on cancer or even married life.  It's Not About Perfect is about eighty percent about Miller's gymnastics career.  I'm okay with that, because I was interested in reading about gymnastics.  Let's face it.  Shannon Miller is where she is, for the most part, because she is such a talented athlete.  It makes sense that such a large portion of her life story would be devoted to life in the gym.  I appreciated her comments about the historic 1996 Summer Games, too.  I was in Armenia at the time and didn't get to watch them live.  Readers who would rather read about Miller's struggle with cancer may be disappointed that there's not more included about that battle.  In a way, the book's title is a bit misleading.

I thought Miller's book was mostly well written.  She comes across as a pleasant person, albeit more religious than I expected.  She mentions her faith more than a few times in her story.  I have nothing against people who have faith in God.  Some people may feel like this book is a bit whitewashed in that Miller mostly keeps her comments about her coaches and gymnastics very positive.  She writes about working out with serious injuries, enduring surgeries, competing when she was tired or sick, and glosses over the politics involved with assembling an Olympic team.  But I got the sense she didn't want to alienate anyone and, perhaps, was not quite as candid as she could have been.

Interestingly enough, I read in a review on Amazon.com that Shannon Miller was raised Christian Scientist, which means that early in her career, she didn't necessarily go to doctors.  But she and her mother, Claudia, are both cancer survivors and were saved by the powers of modern medicine.  It would have been a great asset to Miller's book had she written more about that aspect of her faith.  Apparently, in Shannon Miller: My Child, My Hero, her mother's book, the Christian Science part of her upbringing is discussed.  Now, even though that book was published in 1999, I'm thinking I might have to read it.  Anyone who reads this blog regularly knows how much I like to learn about fringe religions.  Edited to add: I read a large excerpt of Claudia Miller's book on Google and it looks like a lot of the information is pretty much the same as what's in Miller's most recent book.

Miller also is mum about her first marriage to ophthalmologist, Chris Phillips.  That marriage did not last long and Shannon mostly says it's because they didn't know each other very well.  Of course, perhaps it was best that she not write too much about that marriage since her ex husband basically accused her of infidelity.  From what I gathered, the split was nasty and it was probably best not to rehash the relationship in the book.  I remember photos of them in People magazine when the wedding happened and other readers probably do, too.  

I thought it was pretty cool that Shannon included photos, including one of her smiling radiantly while holding her son, Rocco, and sporting a totally bald head.  Her trademark frizzy hair has since grown back after it fell out during chemotherapy.  It looks like it's no longer frizzy.  Shannon's looking sleek and professional these days.

Anyway... It's Not About Perfect: Competing for My Country and Fighting for My Life is probably not a bad read for most gymnastics fans.  It's not really juicy or scandalous, but it's not terrible.  Those who want to read more about Shannon's personal life or struggle with ovarian cancer may be left wanting.  I think I'd give it three and a half stars.


5 comments:

  1. Just a small correction as I know quite about about Shannon having been a huge fan of hers in her heyday. She is not a lawyer. She attended Boston University for her law degree, which she got, but she never took the bar. She went to law school in an effort to assist her with the contracts she was signing as part of her appearances, etc. She doesn't now, nor has she ever, practiced law.

    Also, her first marriage to Chris was a disaster and nothing I would write about either considering he went on to be sued, declare bankruptcy, have an issue with prescription drugs, and be arrested in Canada a year or so ago. That guy is totally off the chain and the less time (and page space) devoted to him, the better I'm thinking.

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    1. Thanks for the comment about Chris. I would have imagined it would not have been smart to write too much about that marriage.

      As for the part about the law degree, she does write extensively about that and emphasizes that she doesn't practice. I will note that in the review.

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  2. A little more about Chris: http://ottawacitizen.com/news/local-news/ottawa-police-probing-threat-at-hotel-after-man-on-rcmp-alert-believed-to-be-located

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