Tuesday, June 14, 2016

Reposted review of I Sold My Soul on eBay: Viewing Faith through an Athiest's Eyes

Here's yet another Epinions review I hope to save from oblivion.  Enjoy!


  • How an atheist looks at America's Sunday morning church ritual

    Review by knotheadusc
     in Books, Music, Hotels & Travel 
      June, 14 2010
  • Pros: Interesting look at church through an atheist's perspective.
    Cons: Takes a broader approach than I was expecting.
    eBay has changed the face of American commerce, making some rather unconventional methods of earning money available to people smart enough to come up with a clever gimmick. Hemant Mehta is one such clever guy. In January 2006, when he was 22 years old, Mehta came up with a very interesting moneymaking proposal. An atheist since he was 14 years old, Mehta held an auction to get eBayers to send him to church.

    His proposal read as follows:

    I'm a 22-year-old from Chicago. I stopped believing in God when I was 14. Currently, I am an active volunteer for a couple of different national, secular organizations. For one of them, I am the editor of a newsletter that reaches over 1,000 atheist/agnostic college students. I have written several Letters to the Editor to newspapers in and around Chicago, espousing my atheistic beliefs when Church/State issues arose. My point being that I don't take my non-belief lightly. However, while I don't believe in God, I firmly believe I would immediately change those views if presented with evidence to the contrary. And at age 22, this is possibly the best chance anyone has of changing me.

    So here's my proposal. Every time I come home, I pass this old Irish church. I promise to go into that church every day-- for a certain number of days-- for at least an hour each visit. For every $10 you bid, I will go to the Church for 1 day. For $50, you would have me going to mass every day for a week.
     (15)

    Mehta continues by promising to go to church willingly and keep an open mind, yet not saying or doing anything inappropriate. He offers to volunteer with the church and interact with the people of the church and do his best to learn about the churchgoers' beliefs. He also promises to maintain a diary, take photos, or secure any other type of proof the winning bidder desires in order to uphold his end of the bargain.

    Proving that Americans love a good gimmick and are willing to pay for it, Mehta was successful in finding someone to pay him to attend church. The winning bidder of his auction was Jim Henderson, a minister from Seattle, Washington, who paid $504 to get Mehta to attend church. Mehta donated the money to the Secular Student Alliance, one of the organizations Mehta was involved with when he was a student.

    Instead of just attending the old Irish church, however, Henderson opted to have Mehta try a variety of different churches and maintain his impressions on Henderson's Web site, www.offthemap.com. And Mehta did make good on his end of the deal, visiting churches in four different states that ranged from mega-sized to small and intimate. Mehta's eBay experiment led to his decision to write his 2007 book, I Sold My Soul on eBay: Viewing Faith through an Athiest's Eyes.

    My thoughts

    This book wasn't exactly what I thought it was going to be when I decided to buy it. I was under the impression that Mehta's memoirs of an atheist sitting in church would be about just that... sitting in church. But it turns out I Sold My Soul on eBay is also about what makes an atheist tick. He offers some commentary on the atheist movement, as well as some insight as to why he gave up Jainism, the faith Mehta grew up in.

    Mehta's eBay experiment led him to attend some very well known megachurches, to include Ted Haggard's New Life Church and Joel Osteen's Lakewood Church. Mehta offers his observations of what it was like for him as a non-believer. While I'm no atheist, I can understand where he was coming from, particularly when he writes of his experiences in the megachurches, a burgeoning American phenomenon that I personally find a big turn off. That being said, not all of Mehta's observations are negative. He has good things to say about Joel Osteen, going as far as to quip "I may be an atheist, but I love Joel" (123). Based on Osteen's constant presence on television over the past few years, so do a lot of other Americans.

    Toward the end of the book, Mehta offers his thoughts on both what works and what's wrong with typical Christian church services. I didn't agree with all of Mehta's insights; for example, he says he wishes there was less singing. I don't attend church regularly anymore, but one of the one things I do enjoy about church services is the music. Mehta also complains that a lot of Christians have an intolerant attitude toward atheists.  I can agree with that statement.  On the other hand, Mehta also observes that a lot of churches offer valuable community outreach, which he claims to find commendable, and some of the pastors he met made sure their messages were very relevant.  The pastors who kept their messages useful to Mehta today stood the best chance of getting him to change his mind about religion and go back to church.

    At the end of the book, Mehta writes an interesting chapter about what it would take to get him to convert. He writes that he still has unanswered questions about Christianity, though at this point, he's still a devout atheist. As I was reading this chapter, I started to wonder why it should matter to most people whether or not Mehta chooses to believe in God. But then it occurred to me that for many devout Christians, it really does matter. And so, for those people, Mehta's last words may be the most compelling in the book. I'm sure former teen heart-throb Kirk Cameron, who has famously become a devout Christian and even ambushed Mehta on a radio program, would want to know how to get him to believe and be "saved".

    This book includes a guide for discussion groups. I'm sure the guide is very useful for those who want to read this book as a group and toss around some ideas afterward. Mehta also offers some notes at the end of the book with clarifications and more resources, along with an invitation to join his personal blog, www.friendlyatheist.com.

    Overall

    I liked this book. I guess I would have enjoyed it more if it had been more focused on just the eBay auction and was written more like a story instead of a progress report, but I did find Mehta's observations intriguing. Mehta has a friendly, honest, engaging voice; he's intelligent and seems to have an open mind, and that's very refreshing. One thing potential readers should know is that Mehta mostly confines his church attendance to Protestant denominations, which may or may not have affected his opinions.

    I would recommend I Sold My Soul on eBay to those who are interested in learning more about Atheism, as well as those who find religion stimulating. I will warn, however, that this book takes a broader approach than I was expecting. It's not as much as a memoir as I was thinking it would be, which may or may not be appealing to other readers.

    For more information: www.friendlyatheist.com
    www.waterbrookpress.com

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