Sunday, December 7, 2014

My review of Brooke Shields' Down Came The Rain...

Reposting this old review of Brooke Shields' book, Down Came The Rain for those who are interested.

Brooke Shields goes public with her private hell... Oct 9, 2006 (Updated Oct 16, 2006)
Review by knotheadusc
Rated a Very Helpful Review


Pros: Well-written account of the horrors of postpartum depression.

Cons: May upset those who can't empathize with Shields because of her wealth.

The Bottom Line: This is a worthwhile read for anyone who wants to learn more about postpartum depression.

Having come of age in the 1980s, I have always been very familiar with Brooke Shields' work as an actress. Brooke Shields has always appeared to be a woman who has it all... looks, brains, money, a successful and apparently fulfilling career, and at last, just a few years ago, she seemed to have found love in her second husband, Chris Henchy. The one thing that was missing was a baby. Unfortunately, Shields was having trouble getting pregnant. She had once had cervical surgery to remove precancerous cells and the surgery had left her cervix shortened and scarred. As a result, in order to have a child of their own, Shields and her husband had to undergo in vitro fertilization. Shields got pregnant, but suffered a miscarriage that was so emotionally painful that she almost decided to give up on her dream of being a mother. But Brooke Shields found that she couldn't forget about having a baby. She underwent IVF again and got pregnant and this time it stuck. Nine months later in May 2003, Brooke Shields and her husband, Chris Henchy, became the proud parents of Rowan Francis. And then, Brooke Shields found herself holding a ticket into the hell of postpartum depression. That hell is what prompted her to write her 2004 book, Down Came The Rain: My Journey Through Postpartum Depression.

I have to admit, I read this book partly because my husband, Bill, and I have been trying to have a baby. Like Brooke Shields and her husband, we have some issues that may prevent us from conceiving naturally. I also have a strong biological history of major depression, so I may be at risk of postpartum depression if I do have a baby. Also, I found this book used and dirt cheap at Fort Belvoir's thrift shop. I doubt I would have thought to buy this book at its full price or even borrow it at a library, but I am glad I read it. It turns out Brooke Shields is a pretty good writer and her topic is both timely and relevant to a lot of new parents.

Down Came The Rain is not an autobiography of Brooke Shields' life, although it does include some information about her family. The information is personal, but it also has something to do with Shields' state of mind and stress level as she embarked on her quest to become a mother. First off, Shields and her first husband, Andre Agassi, were divorced after two years of marriage. Shields doesn't write much about their time together, except to explain that they had both wanted children, but the opportunity had never presented itself. Not long after the split with Agassi, Shields met and subsequently married Chris Henchy. Then, Shields' father became very ill with prostate cancer. He died just three weeks before Rowan Francis was born. All the while, Shields was also dealing with insecurity about her future in show business. She had taken time off for her pregnancy and Rowan's birth.

Divorce, remarriage, fertility issues, childbirth, career issues, and the loss of a parent are all extremely stressful events on their own. With all of those issues combined together, it must have been almost impossible for Brooke Shields to function. Shields also had serious medical trouble during the birth of her daughter. The child had to be delivered by Cesarean section; the cord was wrapped around her neck. Shields' uterus had herniated and she almost had to have a hysterectomy. Somehow, Shields and her baby survived the birthing process intact. Shields was left to recover from major surgery as she became acquainted with her baby daughter and the huge role of being a parent.

To be sure, I could empathize a bit with Brooke Shields. She's a human being and certainly not immune to human problems like postpartum depression. Shields initially didn't want to go on Paxil, the antidepressant that helped her get through her ordeal with postpartum depression. She didn't like the connotations that she needed a drug to help her with her moods. I can identify with that sentiment. When I had depression, I didn't want to take a drug to feel better, either. I liked to think I could will myself to feel normal. Once I found the right antidepressant, it became enormously clear to me that clinical depression is a very real biological problem that affects the whole body. Brooke Shields also came to that conclusion. She started to feel better and was able to function with the help of antidepressants. Like me, she became a believer in the drugs' efficacy, despite her very famous public feud with Tom Cruise about their usefulness.

I applaud Brooke Shields for writing this book about her very personal and painful experiences with the hell of depression and her success using antidepressants. I think it's always helpful when people talk about personal experiences with mental illness because it helps reduce the lingering stigma. I also like the fact that Shields apparently no longer feels ashamed of her use of antidepressants. Too many people don't seek medical help for depression because they fear becoming "hooked on happy pills". As someone who has experienced depression and has taken antidepressants, I can affirm that the pills never made me feel "happy". Indeed, they made me feel normal, which was a huge improvement over feeling hopeless and suicidal.

On the other hand, as I was reading Down Came The Rain, it was very clear to me that Brooke Shields has advantages that most women don't have. For one thing, she hired a baby nurse to help her as she was getting over her postpartum depression. Although Shields makes it clear that the nurse was temporary and she had no intention of handing over the job of raising Rowan to hired help, most women don't have the financial resources to hire baby nurses when they suffer from postpartum depression. In fact, far too many women can't even afford to take the antidepressants that Shields took as she suffered with postpartum depression. And it also occurred to me that some who read this book may even feel somewhat bitter about the fact that Shields was able to afford several rounds of IVF, too. That's a procedure that is well beyond the budgets of many Americans.

Clearly, with her financial resources, Brooke Shields can afford solutions that are well above the grasp of many women. I don't mean to imply that Brooke Shields wasn't right to use whatever means necessary to get past her postpartum depression; I just think that some women might resent the fact that they don't have access to the resources that Shields does. Shields explains what she did to get over the depression, but she doesn't offer solutions for ordinary women who can't afford to hire baby nurses or seek out sophisticated medical help.

Also, it's important to know that Down Came The Rain is not the story of Brooke Shields' life. This is strictly an account of her experiences with postpartum depression. She explains what the depression felt like, how it affected the people around her, and what she did to get over it, but that's about it. If you're looking for a whole lot of insight about Brooke Shields' life outside of her experiences with postpartum depression, you might be left disappointed. There is no photo section, although there is a small picture of Brooke Shields and Rowan on the inside of the book cover.

All in all, I think Down Came The Rain is a good personal account of the phenomenon of postpartum depression. And if after reading this book you're left wanting to learn more about postpartum depression, Shields includes a reading list and addresses to reputable Web sites that offer information about the disorder. I think Brooke Shields has written a valuable book that will help a lot of people who are caught in the throes of postpartum depression, whether they be new mothers or the people who love them. What's more, Shields' story ultimately has a happy ending, since she has gone on to become a mother again. On April 18, 2006, Shields and Henchy became parents again to daughter, Grier Hammond... ironically, on the very same day and in the same hospital where Tom Cruise and Katie Holmes had their baby girl, Suri.

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