Tuesday, October 28, 2014

Repost of my review of Escape from Camp 14

I went through a phase a few years ago and read a bunch of books about North Korea.  This morning, I read an article on CNN written by Shin Dong-hyuk, the only known person to grow up in and escape a North Korean prison camp.  He has been labeled "human scum" by North Korea's leaders.  They claim that his description of what life is like in a North Korean prison camp is a pack of lies.

I found Escape from Camp 14, Shin Dong-hyuk's book, extremely fascinating.  Aside from having an amazing story to tell, Shin Dong-hyuk is a talented artist.  You can see some of his drawings on the CNN article, though I must warn that they are basically artistic depictions of how prisoners are treated in North Korea.  Some people may find them disturbing.  I did find them a bit graphic, yet I also marveled at Shin Dong-hyuk's talents and I'm glad he is now free to share them with the rest of the world.

Growing up and escaping North Korea's Camp 14...
Jul 12, 2012 (Updated Jul 13, 2012)

Review by knotheadusc in Books

Rated a Very Helpful Review

Pros:Fascinating story. Horrifying. Haunting drawings.

Cons:Horrifying. Occasionally depressing.
The Bottom Line: Be grateful you don't have to escape Camp 14.

For the past few years, I've been fascinated with stories about North Korea, one of the world's most opaque countries. That's why I felt compelled to read journalist Blaine Harden's new book, Escape from Camp 14: One Man's Remarkable Odyssey from North Korea to Freedom in the West (2012). This book is the true story of a young man named Shin Dong-hyuk, who was born and raised in Camp 14, an oppressive North Korean political prison and later managed to escape. Though I had a feeling that parts of Escape from Camp 14 would probably depress me, I figured that ultimately the story would end on a somewhat triumphant note. And again, I think oppressive regimes are oddly fascinating.

Who is Shin Dong-hyuk and why was he raised in prison?

Shin Dong-hyuk was born in 1982, the second son of parents who had somehow managed to be allowed to get married. Shin's parents didn't marry because they loved each other. They married because they were being rewarded for doing something good. Sex between inmates at Camp 14 was forbidden, except between married couples. After their wedding, the happy couple was allowed five nights together; then they were separated and Shin's father was allowed to visit periodically. Shin's older brother was born in 1974 and by the time Shin was old enough to remember much, he had already been sent to live in a boy's dormitory. When Shin was still a very young boy, he too was sent to live in a dorm. It wasn't too big of a deal, though, since Shin didn't have much of a bond with his mother, anyway. They were too busy working to form a bond.

In North Korea, people who commit crimes against the state are severely punished. So are their families. A person who gets caught doing something illegal will go to prison and so will his or her parents, siblings, and any children. The whole family pays for one person's actions; consequently, there's a lot of peer pressure to be on one's best behavior. Shin was born in the prison and never knew any other life, mainly because two uncles tried to escape North Korea back in 1951. Shin's childhood was spent working, starving, and being beaten and indoctrinated. He spent those years fearing for his life; for the punishment for disobedience was being shot on the spot. When Shin accidentally broke a sewing machine, he paid for it by sacrificing part of a finger.

When Shin was 13, his mother and brother attempted to escape Camp 14. Shin overheard their plans. Like any good North Korean prisoner, Shin felt compelled to alert the authorities. Not alerting the authorities of an escape attempt meant being shot. The guards were able to stop the escape attempt and Shin was rewarded by being tortured and interrogated. Then, he and his father were forced to watch as his mother and brother were executed. He was not sad to see them die. He thought they were selfish for putting him in the position to have to tell on them.

It took Shin months to recover from the injuries he suffered while he was being tortured. During that time, he met a man who told him about life outside of the camp. Shin was fascinated that there was a world beyond the electrified fence. But he also knew that the fence was deadly and would kill him if he tried to flee. And if he was caught even thinking about escaping, he would be shot.

Years later, Shin met another man who told him more about the world outside the fence. Shin found himself obsessed with the notion of escaping. With his new friend's help, Shin hatched an escape plan and successfully escaped the political prison in 2005. Harden relates Shin's amazing story of breaking out of the North Korean camp and eventually making it to South Korea, then the United States.

My thoughts

Whenever I start to feel badly about my own life, all I have to do is remember what Shin Dong-hyuk has already endured in his 30 years on the planet. He grew up starving, friendless, and without much of a family, imprisoned for crimes he had nothing to do with. Against all odds, he broke free to go to a new country that for most of his life, he had no idea even existed. Adjusting to that new life in rich, opulent South Korea was extremely difficult. And then when he went to the United States to tell other people about his life in Camp 14, he had a hard time adjusting... and relating to other people.

Harden's done a great job with Shin's story, maintaining an objective yet compassionate tone as he describes the atrocities Shin and other prisoners endured. It makes any problems I face seem trivial. This book took a long time to read and was, at times, a bit depressing. It's not pleasant to read about innocent people being starved, beaten, and brainwashed. However, I have to admire Shin's courage for escaping, even as he experienced guilt knowing that his father would certainly be punished for his escape... and the man who came with him on his break for freedom ultimately ended up being killed by the electric fence. Shin used the man's body to insulate him against the electricity-- without that dead body, Shin never would have made it to freedom. He's paid a price, though, through constant nagging guilt. At this writing, Shin Dong-hyuk is the only person known to have managed to escape prison and defect from North Korea.

At the end of this book, Harden includes drawings Shin did that depict the horrors of Camp 14. I found the crude drawings haunting and horrifying. There are also photos.

Overall

I would definitely recommend Escape from Camp 14 to anyone who is interested in North Korea or likes true stories about overcoming adversity. This is not a happy book, but I found it fascinating to read and I definitely rooted for Shin Dong-hyuk.

Recommend this product? Yes

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