Friday, October 15, 2010

An open letter to angry adult stepchildren...

Before I start with today's post, I want to explain that my thoughts today are not necessarily directed to my stepchildren. After all, in eight years I have only met my stepchildren once and, since then, have had absolutely no contact with them. No... today's post is for angry stepchildren who still talk to both of their parents and, for whatever reason, hate one or both of their stepparents.

Yesterday, I was hanging out at one of my favorite online communities when I noticed a post written by a guy who was very upset with his father. This fellow, who is very open about being a homosexual, had recently written a heart-felt letter to his dad about his homosexuality. He was asking his dad for understanding and support. His father, apparently, didn't respond to the letter the way the writer had hoped he would.

So my online friend was understandably devastated about this turn of events and, in the course of describing his pain, happened to refer to his father's wife as a "heinous harpy". He did not explain why he thought of his stepmother that way. In fact, most of his posts were about his relationship with his father. But I couldn't help but notice that, for some reason, he seemed to hate his stepmother and felt the need to express his hatred in a post that, at least on the surface, had nothing to do with her.

Here's what I'd like to say to that guy, along with anyone else who hates their stepparent(s), yet still loves their parent(s). You may have a very good reason for hating your mother's or father's spouse. Or you may not have a good reason for hating them. But have you considered the reasons why your parent married that person? Put aside your personal feelings for a moment and think about it. Just spend a few minutes looking at life through your parent's eyes.

Divorce sucks. It sucks for almost everybody, including many stepparents. Yes, if you are a child of divorce, you absolutely have a right to be hurt, confused, angry, etc. But chances are, your parent is hurting too, and would like the chance to try to be happy with someone else. Do you really expect your parent to go through life alone, just because their first try at marriage didn't work out? Would you actually want them to be alone as they get older and less independent?

Like it or not, your parent made a choice to invite another person into his or her life. Your parent had his or her own reasons for doing so. Maybe you don't agree with your parent's reasons or taste. Maybe your stepmother or stepfather is cruel or hateful to you. Maybe you feel like he or she takes your parent's attention away from you or tries to shut you out of your parent's life. Perhaps your parent's remarriage has destroyed any hopes that your parents might reconcile.

All of these issues are valid reasons for you to feel the way you do. But I'm asking you to stop and consider your parent's feelings. Think about why he or she made the choice to invite this new person into their life. Then, if you're able, take an objective look at your stepparent. Is he or she really worthy of your hatred? Does your parent genuinely love his or her spouse? Have you taken a moment to see what your parent sees in their wife or husband?

Then, think about this... Did you decide to hate your stepparent? Or did your other parent make that decision for you? Consider this. I have met my husband's daughters just once. During our one meeting, which barely lasted 48 hours, my husband's daughters and I seemed to get along just fine. One of them went as far as to give me a big hug and refer to me as her other mother. But not long after that meeting, my husband's daughters mysteriously started distancing themselves from their dad until finally, in 2004, they stopped talking to him altogether and, in 2006, actually sent him letters demanding that he let their current stepfather adopt them.

 Since I haven't seen or talked to my husband's kids since that one meeting which had seemed to go so well, I can't help but think their mother was somehow threatened by me and told them they should hate me, as well as their dad for choosing to marry me. In other words, the girls didn't decide to dislike me until their mother decided for them that I was a bad person. Incidentally, I have never met their mother, and she has very limited knowledge of me, so I'm not sure how she determined I was so evil. I try not to take it personally, since I have a feeling she would have hated anyone my husband had chosen to marry.

Here's something else to consider. Relationships are always a two-way street. You may hate your stepparent and that may be all very well and good. But your stepparent may also reserve the right to feel the same way about you, especially if you're an adult. You might not care about how they feel, but if you want to have a good relationship with your parent, you might be wise to reconsider the way you treat his or her spouse. There may come a time when you'll wish you were on better terms with them.

Marriage is a dicey business at best. Statistics show that about half of all married couples eventually divorce. Many of those people will have children, so there are lots of people in the child-of-divorce boat. Moreover, a lot of those children-of-divorce will eventually grow up and be divorced themselves. If that ever happens to you, would you want to spend the rest of your life alone just to spare your child's feelings? Would you want your child to have the right to choose your mate for you, especially since most kids eventually grow up and have lives of their own?

In our society, most people reject the idea of arranged marriages decided by their parents or anyone else. Do you really think you should have the right to reject your parent's choice for a spouse? Would you want your kids to overrule your choice of whom to marry? And would you be happy if your parent eventually divorced and remarried a third or fourth time? Remember, divorce sucks... and it's very expensive. I think the only people who could possibly enjoy the process of divorce are those who get a paycheck from it. Chances are, if your parent divorces several times, he or she might not be as financially well-prepared to handle growing older. If he or she wants to remarry, it makes good sense to let them (hopefully) choose the right spouse, once and for all.

I know for a fact that my husband is less lonely and a lot happier with me than he ever was with his ex-wife. We are very compatible with each other. Certainly, things would have been less complicated had he and I met first. But that didn't happen. We make each other happy and belong together. Most parents want the best for their children and hope they will be happy. I'd like to think that a loving child would want the same for their parent(s). I know my husband's happiness has led to his being healthier and wealthier... perhaps giving his kids more time to reconsider whether or not they really do want to throw away their real dad for good.

Life is pretty short and there may come a time when you'll wish you had more time to spend with your mother or father. If you love your parent(s), I would expect you'd want for them what they, hopefully, want for you... health and happiness and freedom from loneliness.

It's true that you may have all the legitimate reasons in the world to hate your stepparent(s). All I'm asking you to do is to take a minute to understand where your hatred is coming from and determine whether or not it's truly valid. Maybe your stepmom is a harpy or your stepfather is a selfish bastard. But your parent chose them to be a part of their lives. They must have had a reason... And maybe you should try to have some respect for their reasons. I'm sure you'd wish for and expect the very same if you're ever in their shoes.

3 comments:

  1. All very well said. A friend of mine is fond of saying, "Most people vote within three miles of their homes". His point wasn't so much about geography as it was about awareness. Unfortunately, most people are only aware of what immediately surrounds them, and take no time to see the bigger picture.

    If we would only take the time to do this more often, we might someday get a true glimpse of "Indra's Web", the Buddhist allegory of inter-connectedness. We are all connected in some way and what we think, do, and feel in someway affects others either for the good or bad.

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  2. Well Put, I think I will print this out for the stepdaughter that I raised, who turned verbally and physically abusive, left, stopped speaking to us for 2 years and now has come back because she needs money and has no where to live. Now, I get to relive the drama she has put into my life.

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  3. Sorry to read about your troubles with your stepdaughter, Jennifer Lyns. Step-life is so hard. I know it's hard for kids, but I think so few people seem to understand how hard it is for the parents, too. I have mostly been spared step drama because my husband's ex wife very effectively alienated the kids so they wanted nothing to do with us. I used to be sad about it, but now I think the ex gave me a gift. My husband, on the other hand, would have liked to have had the chance to raise his daughters. Too bad his ex wife didn't think he was good enough for that... though she did think he was good enough to make babies with.

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